Helping children build character through online books, standards-based lessons and engaging English Language Arts activities.

Sojourner Truth: Black History Month Fact 16

BLACK HISTORY MONTH FACT #16

Did you know even though Sojourner Truth was born a slave and had no formal education, she became a historical leader in the fight against slavery and women's rights?

In 1851, Sojourner delivered her famous speech, "Ain’t I A Woman" in support for equality and women's rights.

Source: Library of Congress

Sojourner Truth Black History Fact

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President Barack Obama: Education and Civil Rights: Black History Month Fact 15

BLACK HISTORY MONTH FACT #15

Did you know President Obama is a graduate of Harvard Law School and Columbia University?

After law school, President Obama worked as a civil rights attorney helping people protect their rights.

President Obama believes in protecting citizens’ civil rights and granting them equal opportunities.

Source: The White House

President Barack Obama: Education and Civil Rights

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President Barack Obama Before He Became President: Black History Month Fact 14

BLACK HISTORY MONTH FACT #14

Did you know President Barack Obama, the first African American President, used to teach constitutional law at the University of Chicago?

Before he became president, President Obama also worked with churches to rebuild communities affected by job loss.

President Obama believes that people have the strength to achieve any goal by working together.

Source: The White House

President Obama Before He Became President

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Civil Rights Act & Voting Rights Act Dr. Martin Luther King: Black History Month Fact 13

BLACK HISTORY MONTH FACT #13

Did you know that even after the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was passed, Dr. Martin Luther King continued to fight for equal voting rights?

The Civil Rights Act made it illegal to treat people differently because of the color of their skin, but there were still voting laws that made it difficult for black people to vote.

Dr. King and others used non-violent protests, walks and speeches to fight against these unfair voting laws. In 1965 the Voting Rights Act was passed, which outlawed unfair voting practices. 

Dr. King’s and other protestors’ non-violent actions contributed to the passing of the Voting Rights Act. 

 

Source: Library of Congress

 

Civil Rights Act & Voting Rights Act Dr. Martin Luther King BLACK HISTORY MONTH FACT

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1964 Nobel Peace Prize Winner Dr. Martin Luther King: Black History Month Fact 12

BLACK HISTORY MONTH FACT #12

Did you know Dr. Martin Luther King, the most important voice in the fight for equal rights, won a Nobel Peace Prize in 1964?

Dr. King traveled over six million miles and spoke over twenty-five hundred times to stand up for injustices and inequality. 

In 1964, Dr. King was the youngest man to receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

Source: Nobel Prize Web

Nobel Peace Prize in 1964 Dr. Martin Luther King

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Mathematician and Astronomer Benjamin Banneke: Black History Month Fact 11

BLACK HISTORY MONTH FACT #11

Did you know Benjamin Banneker a mathematician, and astronomer, taught himself mathematics through textbooks he borrowed?

As an adult, Benjamin used mathematics and astronomy to predict the weather and write his own almanac, which was used by farmers.     

Benjamin’s work was so impressive that Thomas Jefferson recommended him to join the survey team that mapped out Washington, D.C.

Source: Library of Congress

Mathematician and Astronomer Benjamin Banneke: Black History Month Fact 11

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The Will of Wilma Rudolph: Black History Month Fact 10

BLACK HISTORY MONTH FACT #10

Did you know Wilma Rudolph, the first American woman to win three Gold Track & Field medals in one Olympics didn’t walk without support-braces until she was 9 years old.

Due to a childhood illness, Wilma’s left leg was twisted, but she didn’t let that stop her. Wilma went on to play basketball in high-school, win four Olympic medals, set world records, and start the Wilma Rudolph Foundation to help young athletes.

Source: WhiteHouse Kids

The Will of Wilma Rudolph: Black History Month Fact 10

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First Lady Michelle Obama’s Careers: Black History Month Fact #9

BLACK HISTORY MONTH FACT #9

Did you know while working as a lawyer First Lady Michelle Obama decided to switch careers, because she wanted a job where she could help people make their community and neighborhoods better?

After her law career, First Lady Obama worked at the University of Chicago where she developed the university’s first community service program and helped increase volunteerism.

Source: WhiteHouse.Gov

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First Lady Michelle Obama’s Education: Black History Month Fact #8

BLACK HISTORY MONTH FACT #8

Did you know First Lady Michelle Obama is not only the wife of President Obama, and the mother of Malia and Sasha, she’s also a Harvard Law School graduate?  

Before obtaining her law degree from Harvard, the First Lady attended Princeton University, where she received degrees in sociology and African-American studies.  

Source: WhiteHouse.Gov and America.Gov

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The Many Roles of Harriet Tubman: Black History Month Fact #7

BLACK HISTORY MONTH FACT #7

Did you know even though Harriet Tubman was born a slave, she grew up to accomplish extraordinary things? 

Harriet lead hundreds of slaves to freedom in the North, became a leader in the movement against slavery and a spy for the Union Army during the Civil War.  

In addition to these accomplishments, Harriet Tubman also saved lives as a nurse during the Civil War.

Source: The Library Of Congress

Black History Month Fact

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Frederick Douglass Supported the Women’s Movement: Black History Month Fact #6

BLACK HISTORY MONTH FACT #6

Did you know Frederick Douglass was not only a contributor to the abolishment of slavery, but also supported the women's rights movement?

Douglass believed that women should have the same rights as men, such as voting and holding positions in government.

Source: National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior

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Frederick Douglas: Black History Month Fact #5

BLACK HISTORY MONTH FACT #5

Did you know even though Frederick Douglass was born a slave he went on to write books about his life, became a major contributor to end slavery, and an advisor for President Abraham Lincoln?

In 1863, during the Civil War, Frederick Douglas advised President Lincoln on the proper treatment of black soldiers.

Source: Library of Congress

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Dr. Patricia E. Bath Doctor & Inventor: Black History Month Fact #4

BLACK HISTORY MONTH FACT #4

Did you know Dr. Patricia E. Bath, an African American doctor and inventor, invented the Laserphaco Probe that helps treat cataracts, a common cause of blindness?

Dr. Bath is also the co-founder of the American Institute for the Prevention of Blindness, which has the goal of preventing blindness and restoring eyesight worldwide.

Source: United States National Library of Medicine

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Honesty

Being sincere or free of lying.

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Dr. Carter G. Woodson: Black History Month Fact #3

BLACK HISTORY MONTH FACT #3

Did you know Dr. Carter G. Woodson, the main founder of Black History Month, didn’t start school until he was 19 years old?

Dr. Woodson wasn’t able to afford school so he taught himself his ABCs and math. He also worked in the coalmines until he had enough money to go to school.

At a young age, Dr. Woodson understood he would need a formal education to achieve his dreams. That’s why he did everything possible to receive an education.

Source: America.gov Archive
http://www.america.gov

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Original Celebration Length of Black History: Black History Month Fact #2

Black History Month Fact #2

Did you know from 1926 to 1976, Black History was celebrated for only one week in February?

In 1976, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History extended the celebration of Black History to one full month.

And that’s why we have Black History Month today.

Source: Association for the Study of African American Life and History http://www.asalh.org

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Character Education Coloring Page

Great Character Education Coloring Pages for Girls and Boys

Download our Sweet Sadie Mae, Barkley and Maggie coloring pages.

Tell us where to send your free coloring page and we'll send the link to download them.

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The Celebration of Black History: Black History Month Fact #1

Black History Month Fact #1

Did you know the original idea of celebrating Black History was created in 1925 by Dr. Carter G. Woodson and the Association for the Study of African American Life and History?

It wasn’t until 1926, one year later, that the first official celebration of Black History took place.

Source: Association for the Study of African American Life and History http://www.asalh.org

Black History Month Fact

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What Does Respect Mean?

Respect means having high regard for someone or something. 

Respect Definition:

Having high regard for someone or something.

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Kindness

Displaying care and concern for others. 

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Good Quality Character Traits Every Kid Should Have

As parents, grandparents and caregivers, there are numerous quality traits that we want our children to have. In this article, we’ll talk about five important character traits that are essential for kids to have. These are great traits for children to learn during their character education learning.

Let's Start with Good Character Trait #5: Self-Control

Having self-control over one's mind and body is a great trait for children to have, because it keeps them from making hasty or impulsive decisions. Children and adults who have the ability to stop and think, instead of reacting emotionally or impulsively, in tough situations, exhibit good self-control.

An Example and Benefit of Self-Control in Children

A 10-year-old and a 5-year-old are playing, and the 5-year-old punches the 10-year-old. The first impulse of the older child may be to hit back. Instead, the 10-year-old stops and thinks, “Hey, this 5-year-old is much smaller than me and doesn't know that when he punches me, it hurts. So I’m not going to retaliate by hitting him back.” In this case, the older child has exhibited good self-control, because he thought about the consequences instead of responding on pure impulse. Practicing self control can prevent many bad situations like from occurring.

Ok, Let's Move on to Good Character Trait #4: Courage

When we talk about courage as a character trait in children, we're not talking about the courage to fight off three bullies. We're talking about actions that seem small to us as adults, but are big in children's lives. Courage for children comes in very different ways.

Why is Courage Important for Children?

Courageous children are able to carry out sometimes difficult actions, such as:

  • speaking up for themselves or others when appropriate
  • not always following the crowd, especially when the crowd is engaged in bad/dangerous activities
  • walking away from a fight or argument before it starts

Having courage can arm children with the tools needed to make decisions that can greatly improve their lives. A seemingly little thing like having the courage to say no to a dangerous activity could potentially save another child’s life or their own.

An Example of Courage in Children

A child is hanging out in the neighborhood with a group of friends, and one of them says, “Hey, it would be cool to go play on the train tracks.” The other kids agree and proceed to go play on the tracks. Instead of following his/her friends, the child decides, “Playing on the train tracks is dangerous. Even if my friends are doing it, I'm not going to do it.” Children who are able to make similar decisions have courage, which can help keep them out of harm’s way for years to come.

Ok, Let's Move on to Good Character Trait #3: Kindness

Having kindness, and the ability to show it, is another great character trait that children should have. Kindness includes the quality of being friendly, considerate and generous to other people and the environment.

It’s important for children to learn and practice kindness, because children who are kind to others, and the world around them, are more likely to continue this behavior as adults.

An Example of Kindness in Children

When a child falls or gets hurt, and a classmate asks, “Are you alright?” and helps pick him up, that classmate is showing kindness. Children who have the ability to show kindness, grow up to be adults who are more likely to continue showing kindness to others..

Ok, Let's Move on to Good Character Trait #2: Respect

Respect, or having high regard for someone or something, is another great character trait for children to have. Respect is often earned from or demanded by others.
When children are able to have and show respect for others, they’re more likely to listen, follow directions and be disciplined.

An Example of Respect in Children

The home and classroom are ideal environments for children to practice respect for their parents and teachers. There may be many times when children do not want to do what their parents/teachers say, or do not agree with what their parents/teachers say. At these times, it is important for children to be respectful.

Having respect for a teacher/parent allows children to be obedient, even if they disagree with or do not understand what is being asked of them.

Ok, Let's Move on to Good Character Trait #1: Love

Love is hands down the most important character trait for children to have. While the formal definition of love is “an intense feeling of deep affection,” we know that definition cannot sum up what love is.

Love is intangible and cannot be taught, from a book like other school subjects, but children can learn what love is through positive experiences with parents, family and friends. Childhood experiences can greatly affect how children treat others and themselves as adults.

Children can learn and experience love when:

  • They build positive memories with family and friends
  • Witness positive interactions among family and friends
  • See family members take care of their own mental, physical and spiritual health

Children often learn by imitation; therefore, children who are often surrounded by love are more likely to love others and themselves. Love helps children improve their ability to build healthy relationships as adults.

An Example of Love in Children

A group of children are playing together at the park. An unpopular kid (but the best friend of one of the children) attempts to join the fun. A couple of kids decide to make malicious jokes about the unpopular kid, but one kid (the best friend) decides not to join in on the jokes. He understands that joining in on the jokes, about his friend, is not the way to show his friend love.

Good Character Trait Summary

Let’s review the five quality character traits for children to have:

  1. Love
  2. Respect
  3. Kindness
  4. Courage
  5. Self Control

Situations where these traits are handy are prevalent in our children’s daily lives. Helping your child develop these quality character traits during their developmental years will prepare them to become respectful, caring and kind adults.

In the comments section below, feel free to share other character traits that you believe are ideal for children to have.

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Character Education Curriculum

A curriculum designed with the goals of teaching moral and ethical values.

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Character Education Lesson Plans

Lesson plans designed with the goal of teaching moral and ethical values.

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What is Character Education?

What is Character Education?

Simply put character education is the instruction of moral and ethical values. Usually character education is taught to younger children, during the developmental years, to help them understand how they should treat others, and how to deal with the ethical and moral decisions they will encounter throughout their life.

Why is character education important for children?

Character education is important for children, because it helps them grow into morally responsible adults. Like any other learned subject such as math, science and social studies, children need to learn how to properly treat others and make decisions that are morally and ethically correct.

Having great character helps children be kinder, make better choices and develop integrity, self-discipline and responsibility. These are all qualities of a decent contributor to society, which is the goal of character education when taught to children.

Why Good Character is Important for Children to Have?

Good character is important for children because:

  • It allows children to become positive contributors to their communities
  • It makes children feel good about themselves
  • It helps children love others
  • It allows children to be role models of kindness, integrity, respect and responsibility
  • It initiates the pay-it-forward concept

Let us know your thoughts about characer education. Feel free to leave them in the comments. 

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Character Education

Simply put character education is the instruction of moral and ethical values. Usually character education is taught to younger children, during the developmental years, to help them understand how they should treat others, and how to deal with the ethical and moral decisions they will encounter throughout their life.

0 comments

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